Sunday, February 13, 2011

TURD IN A PUNCH BOWL

There was a small record store by my Grandmother's house when I was a little kid that only sold LPs (no 45s) and everything was full price (no cut outs). I remember taking my allowance money over there a few times and buying albums like Boston's "Don't Look Back" and the Stones' "Emotional Rescue" but I also remember special ordering this soundtrack LP when I couldn't find it anywhere else.

MAD Magazine was my favorite magazine at the time. I never missed an issue. And in 1980 they decided to "present" this teen comedy directed by Robert Downey, Sr. and featuring the first on-screen appearance of Ralph Macchio. The 'hilarious' adventures of military academy students ensues. Hey, it worked for National Lampoon. But it only takes one viewing of this nose picker to realize that this is no "Animal House." Hell, this ain't even "Screwballs."

After the film's release, MAD ran away screaming at the top of their lungs, even apologizing to readers for letting Alfred E. Neuman's face represent this turkey. I remember seeing it in the theatre TWICE and the "turd in the punch bowl" scene is all I could recall for years. It wasn't until years later when the movie finally made it to DVD that I noticed the Kinks song "Yes Sir, No Sir" is used. It wasn't included on the soundtrack LP.

The Capitol Records soundtrack LP is full of 'no wave' power punk pop by Blondie, Jonathan Richman & The Modern Lovers, The Babys, Pat Benatar, Sammy Hagar and Ian Hunter. There's also a few unknown bands called Cheeks (who sound like The Knack) and Blow-Up (who sound like a Hollywood mixture of the Boomtown Rats, Sex Pistols and The Clash and deliver the main title theme "Kicking Up A Fuss"). Refreshingly, there are no disco songs. Anyway, I was one of the few who ever bought this album and I still have it!
http://www.megaupload.com/?d=WV8VLZNU

2 comments:

  1. I remember Mad even spoofing this stinker themselves in print...Throw Up in The Academy I think it was...

    ReplyDelete
  2. god, i remember that one. how did such a crap movie get such a great soundtrack?

    ReplyDelete